WARM Festival 2015 - Sarajevo

Event start: 
28.06.2015 17:00
Event end: 
04.07.2015 23:59
Location: 
Sarajevo

 

 

 

 

WARM FESTIVAL 2015
SARAJEVO - 28th JUNE / 4th JULY

A Festival on Contemporary Conflicts
WARM, “to tell the story with excellence and integrity”

 

PROGRAM

Kino Meeting Point
Welcome Desk & Accreditations, Press Events, Films screenings, Conferences & Discussions, Opening & Closing Ceremonies

Academy of Fine Arts – Java Gallery – Duplex 100m2
All exhibitions are open from June 28th to July 4th.
BBI Center Square
The exibition is opening on July 1st.

The ‘WARM Review #1’ and the ‘Bosnia 1992-1995’ book are on sale during the festival.

PRESS press@warmfoundation.org
Sarajevo: Una Bejtović una@bejtovic.ba

The WARM Festival events are free public events.


Sunday June 28th / 17:00
‘Memory and War Commemoration into question - Sarajevo heart of Europe, a year after’ conference
by Mission du Centenaire 14-18
with Jasmina Pasalic (President of the Foundation Sarajevo Heart of Europe), Joseph Zimet (Director of the Mission du Centenaire 14-18), Nicolas Offenstadt (Historian), Aida Begic (Filmmaker)
Partner Event

Sunday June 28th / 19:30
WARM FESTIVAL OPENING
19:30 / Welcome Drink
21:00 / 
‘This is Exile - Diaries of Child Refugees’, a film by Mani Y. Benchelah
World Premiere
Followed by a discussion with Mani Y. Benchelah

Monday June 29th / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Mani Y. Benchelah
(on covering th war in Syria)

Monday June 29th / 11:00
‘How do we visit Museums? New Tools for new Perspectives of Research and Understanding’ conference
by Denis Peschanski & Stéphane Grimaldi

Monday June 29th / 14:30
‘Fact-checking’ conference
‘How fact-checking works. Its role in conflict reporting’ (panel one)
moderated by Robert Holloway (AFP Foundation)
with Darko Brkan (Zasto Ne), Peter Cunliffe-Jones (Africa Check), Lou Jacobson (Politifact), Amr Sobhy (Egypt)
- ‘Fact-checking photos and videos: the technical challenges’ (panel two)
moderated by Peter Cunliffe-Jones (Africa Check)
with Eric Baradat (AFP Photo), Roger Cozien (Exo Makina), Margo Gontar (StopFake, Ukraine), Rasa Nedeljkov (CRTA)

Monday June 29th / 21:00
‘A Fighting Season’, a film by Oden Roberts

Tuesday June 30th / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Paul Lowe & Ziyah Gafic
(on 'The Forensic Turn' exhibition and photojournalism)

Tuesday June 30th / 11:00
The Forensic Turn’ conference
moderated by Paul Lowe
with Monica Alcazar-Duarte, Ziyah GaficVelma Saric

Tuesday June 30th / 14:30
Restrepo - One Platoon, One Year, One Valley’, a film by Tim Hetherington & Sebastian Junger

Tuesday June 30th / 21:00
‘Tell Spring Not To Come This Year’, a film by Saeed Taji Farouky & Michael McEvoy
Followed by a discussion with Saeed Taji Farouky

Wednesday July 1st / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Emeric Lhuisset
(on 'Maydan - Hundred Portraits' exhibition and his art work)

Wednesday July 1st / 11:00
New Initiatives in Photojournalism’ conference
moderated by Paul Lowe
with Monica Alcazar-Duarte, Maral Deghati (Me-Mo), Ziyah GaficPierre Terdjman (#Dysturb)

Wednesday July 1st / 14:30
‘Korengal’, a film by Sebastian Junger

Wednesday July 1st / 15:30
‘My Body: A War Zone’ exhibition
curated by PCRC & PROOF
with Blake Fitch, Nayan Tara Gurung Kakshapati, Pete Muller, Midhat Poturovic
Exhibition Opening with Edward Ferguson (British Ambassador to BiH), Midhat Poturovic (photographer), Hasija Brankovic (survivor), Tim Bidey (PCRC)
BBI Center Square

Wednesday July 1st / 18:30
Maydan - Hundred Portraits’ exhibition, by Emeric Lhuisset
Exhibition Opening with Emeric Lhuisset
Duplex 100m2

Wednesday July 1st / 21:00
Srebrenica’s Voices’, a film by Nedim Loncarevic
World Premiere
Followed by a discussion with Nedim Loncarevic

Thursday July 2nd / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Peter Bouckaert, Klaartje Quirijns
(on Human Rights Watch Emergencies Team)

Thursday July 2nd / 11:00
‘Human Rights Watch’ conference
with Peter Bouckaert, Emma Daly, Klaartje Quirijns

Thursday July 2nd / 14:30
‘Talking about Rose’, a film by Isabel Coixet
‘The Dictator Hunter’, a film by Klaartje Quirijns
Followed by a discussion with Klaartje Quirijns

Thursday July 2nd / 18:30
‘Terror in Central African Republic’ exhibition, by Marcus Bleasdale
Exhibition Opening with Peter Bouckaert
Java Gallery

Thursday July 2nd / 21:00
E-Team’, a film by Ross Kauffman & Katy Chevigny
Followed by a discussion with Peter Bouckaert

Friday July 3rd / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Sebastian Junger
(on his books and films about war and war reporting)

Friday July 3rd / around the city
‘Migrations’, a photojournalism / street art project by #Dysturb
with Jose Colon, Laurence Geai, Olivier Jobard, Moutafis, Myrto Papadopoulos, Emanuele Satolli
A WARM Partner Project

Friday July 3rd / 11:00
‘Maydan - Hundred Portraits’, a slideshow and discussion by Emeric Lhuisset

Friday July 3rd / 14:30
‘Which Way is The Front Line from Here? The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington’, a film by Sebastian Junger

Friday July 3rd / 18:30
Exhibitions Openings
Discordia’ exhibition, by Moises Saman
A WARM Partner Project
- ‘The Forensic Turn’ exhibition, curated by Paul Lowe
with images by Edmund Clark, Zijah Gafic, Ashley Gilbertson, Shannon Jensen, Simon Norfolk, Fred Ramos
- 'Media & Myth - Mass Media and the Vietnam War' exhibition
curated by Monica Alcazar-Duarte and Lewis Bush with Paul Lowe
with artists Jacob Balzani, Madeleine Corcoran, Cinzia D’Ambrosi, Veronika Lukasova, Amin Musa, Lewis Bush, Monica Alcazar-Duarte
Academy of Fine Arts

Friday July 3rd / 21:00
The Last Patrol’, a film by Sebastian Junger
Followed by a discussion with Sebastian Junger

Saturday July 4th / 19:00
WARM FESTIVAL CLOSING CEREMONY
with Rémy Ourdan, Paul Lowe, Mirsad Purivatra, Damir Sagolj & Festival Guests

‘Commander Khawani’, a film by Florent Marcie
World Premiere
Followed by a discussion with Florent Marcie
A WARM Partner Project

Saturday July 4th / 22:00
WARM Festival Closing Party

 

FULL PROGRAM


Sunday June 28th / 17:00
‘Memory and War Commemoration into question - Sarajevo heart of Europe, a year after’ conference
by Mission du Centenaire 14-18
with Jasmina Pasalic (President of the Foundation Sarajevo Heart of Europe), Joseph Zimet (Director of the Mission du Centenaire 14-18), Nicolas Offenstadt (Historian), Aida Begic (Filmmaker)
Partner Event
Sarajevo started the XXth century with a war and ended it with a war. A symbol in European history, the city came into the spotlight last year around the 28th of June 2014, during the commemoration of the centenial of the First World War. Sarajevo hosted cultural, sporting, educational and scientific events to commemorate a year of European history and to look at the challenges facing the present and the future of the Balkans region. Created under the impulse of European countries and the city of Sarajevo, this international event aimed to promote the values of solidarity, peace, dialogue and cultural diversity in a city still troubled by the consequences of a terrible conflict but with a youth that is bubbling and eager.
A year later, we take a look back on what was done. What is the impact of commemoration on the long and medium term? How can we learn from our strengths and failures for the future? Is commemorating the First World War in Sarajevo different than in other European cities, given its specific situation in European history? What does it mean to commemorate a war with the goal to create a bigger debate on history and culture, and should we even do it? Is Art and History the right medium ?

Sunday June 28th / 19:30
WARM FESTIVAL OPENING
19:30 / Welcome Drink
21:00 / 
‘This is Exile - Diaries of Child Refugees’, a film by Mani Y. Benchelah
World Premiere
Followed by a discussion with Mani Y. Benchelah
An extraordinary intimate portrait of child refugees forced to flee from the violence of Syria’s civil war to neighbouring Lebanon. Filmed over a year by the Emmy-award winning director Mani, the documentary tells the stories of the childrens' lives in their own words and captures the moving truth of how they deal with loss, hardship and the poignancy of dashed hopes. Their testimony in this film is a beautifully crafted microcosm of the human cost of the ongoing civil war in Syria that has forced over 4 million people to flee; half of whom are children.  There is still no end to the war in sight. The documentary is highly topical but it is also a timeless creation that engages with the essence of what it is to be exiled from your home and the normality of life. With its truly poetic visual style there is space for the mind to wander through the film’s locations and to understand the profoundly disturbing truth that these children are unlikely to see their homeland again until adulthood.
Mani is a French-Algerian freelance director, filmmaker and photojournalist who worked on documentary and long news features in Niger, Pakistan, India, Syria, Lebanon and Iraq
(56’ - 2015)

 

Monday June 29th / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Mani Y. Benchelah

Monday June 29th / 11:00
‘How do we visit Museums? New Tools for new Perspectives of Research and Understanding’ conference
by Denis Peschanski & Stéphane Grimaldi
A two part research presentation with the participation of Denis Peschanski discussing ‘Matrice: constructing a memory through imagery, scientific analysis of behavior’ followed by Stephane Grimaldi ‘Matrice The role of images in a museum’: “We want to study visitors’ behaviour in memorials and museums. A major challenge is to focus on the “receiver” rather than on the “transmitter”, on exposition visitor rather than on its creator. Classical questionnaires are not sufficient to get a valid answer. Tools we are using (actually "Eye-trackers", which can be connected to questionnaires in focus groups) alow us to track the behavior of museum visitors. We'll be demonstrating that Eye-tracking can help us to understanding how visitors "read" images ; not only in a museum.”
Denis Peschanski is a senior research associate at CNRS, Center for Twentieth-Century Social History (Paris, Sorbonne), a specialist in history of France during WWII and in historical methodology. He is the president of the scientific council of the Caen Memorial and Rivesaltes Memorial museums.
Stéphane Grimaldi is the general director/CEO of the Caen Memorial since 2005, and a co-founding member of the interdisciplinary program ‘Memory and Memorialization’ (CNRS, Memorial de Caen, 9/11 Foundation, New York University).
Partner: Caen Memorial

Monday June 29th / 14:30
‘Fact-checking’ conference
‘How fact-checking works. Its role in conflict reporting’ (panel one)
moderated by Robert Holloway (AFP Foundation)
with Darko Brkan (Zasto Ne), Peter Cunliffe-Jones (Africa Check), Lou Jacobson (Politifact), Amr Sobhy (Egypt)
- ‘Fact-checking photos and videos: the technical challenges’ (panel two)
moderated by Peter Cunliffe-Jones (Africa Check)
with Eric Baradat (AFP Photo), Roger Cozien (Exo Makina), Margo Gontar (StopFake, Ukraine), Rasa Nedeljkov (CRTA)
Each panel discussion will be followed by a Q&A with the audience.
Partner: AFP Foundation - Sponsor: Open Society Foundation

Monday June 29th / 21:00
‘A Fighting Season’, a film by Oden Roberts
Followed by a discussion with Oden Roberts
On the brink of the 2007 U.S. troop surge, two Army Recruiters face the daunting pressures of recruitment while their own deployment is on the line.  Sgt. Harris (Temple) has been stationed in the recruiting office long enough for it to feel like home.  On the other side of the world, a roadside bomb rips through a Humvee, and after recovering from the attack, Sgt. Mason (Crawford) gets reassigned and winds up in Harris’s office. Mason wants to go back to the front lines, but he finds out that the war isn’t confined to the battlefield.
Oden Roberts, writer and director, is a 2011-2012 San Francisco Film Society KRF production grant recipient for ‘A Fighting Season’.
(82’ - 2015)

 

Tuesday June 30th / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Paul Lowe & Ziyah Gafic

Tuesday June 30th / 11:00
The Forensic Turn’ conference
moderated by Paul Lowe
with Monica Alcazar-Duarte, Ziyah Gafic, Velma Saric

Images of atrocity are deeply problematic, in that they potentially create a tension between form and content and are often accused of re-victimisation, aesthetisation of suffering, compassion fatigue and exploitation. As an alternative, therefore, there is considerable potential in examining images associated with atrocity that do not depict the actual act of violence or the victim itself, but rather depict the spaces and object involved such acts. Images of the absence of visible violence can lead the viewer into an imaginative engagement with the nature of atrocity, and the nature of those who perpetrate it. The media coverage of conflict, disasters and human suffering is full of ethical problems, and the risk of victimisation or exploitation of the subject’s distress is real and present. Whilst such claims are disputable, as an alternative to graphic images of violence an approach to documentary photography has emerged that focuses on the traces of war and conflict rather than its direct effects on the human body. Photographers such as turn their attention to the objects and detritus it produces. By photographing these ‘still lives’ they deal with the complex issues of the ethics of representation whilst simultaneously opening up an imaginative space in which the viewer is invited to engage in a performative interaction with the situation. The panel will explore the 'forensic turn' in photography.
Paul Lowe is the course director for MA Photojournalism & Documentary Photography at London College of Communication. Paul is a photographer who has covered breaking news the world over, including the fall of the Berlin Wall, Nelson Mandela’s release, famine in Africa, the conflict in the former Yugoslavia and the destruction of Grozny. His book ‘Bosnians’ was published in 2005 by Saqi books.
Monica Alcazar-Duarte is engaged with how we read and integrate images and information, at a time when information and its context changes at such a rapid pace. A former charity campaigner, she currently works as a documentary photographer for independent research projects and NGOs in England and abroad. She focuses on societies in turmoil and transition in the midst of a struggle to change.
Ziyah Gafic is a photographer. He published ‘Troubled Islam’ and ‘Quest for identity’.
Velma Saric is the executive director of the Post-Conflict Research Center (PCRC). Saric is a journalist who has worked for the Institute for War and Peace Reporting (IWPR) and the Balkan Investigative Reporting Network (BIRN). She has also worked as a researcher on numerous projects, publications and films about the 1992-1995 Bosnian war.

Tuesday June 30th / 14:30
Special Program: Four films on war by Sebastian Junger
Restrepo - One Platoon, One Year, One Valley’, a film by Tim Hetherington & Sebastian Junger
Photographer Tim Hetherington and journalist Sebastian Junger allow the realities of war to speak for themselves in this unnarrated documentary about a U.S. platoon in Afghanistan. The men of Second Platoon, Battle Company, 173rd Airborne Brigade teeter from naivete to weariness as months of alternating boredom and fighting take their toll. The loss of medic Juan "Doc" Restrepo leads the platoon to name an outpost in the remote Korengal Valley after him.
(93’ - 2010)

Tuesday June 30th / 21:00
‘Tell Spring Not To Come This Year’, a film by Saeed Taji Farouky & Michael McEvoy
Followed by a discussion with Saeed Taji Farouky
‘Tell Spring Not to Come This Year’ follows one unit of the Afghan National Army over the course of their first year of deployment in Helmand without NATO support. It is an intimate film about the human side of combat, told from a largely unheard and misrepresented perspective, that explores the deep personal motivations, desires and struggles of a band of fighting men on the frontline. Without a NATO soldier in sight, and no narrative but their own, this is the war in Afghanistan, through the eyes of the Afghans who live it.
Saeed Taji Faroukyis a director and cinematographer, known for ‘Tell Spring Not to Come This Year’, ‘There Will Be Some Who Will Not Fear Even That Void’ and ‘The Runner’
(83’ - 2015)
Partner: Frontline Club London

Wednesday July 1st / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Emeric Lhuisset

Wednesday July 1st / 11:00
New Initiatives in Photojournalism’ conference
moderated by Paul Lowe
with Monica Alcazar-Duarte, Maral Deghati (Me-Mo), Ziyah Gafic, Pierre Terdjman (#Dysturb)
#Dysturb is a group of freelance photographers, who take current international photojournalism to the streets. By pasting large format photographs on the walls of city hubs, Dysturb presents photojournalism in a new, innovative way, completely independent from the restrictions of conventional news publishing channels. Thus, generating discussion around current issues whilst also developing community engagement. A WARM Partner Project.
Me-Mo, created by a group of committed photojournalists and talented developers, is pushing the limits of visual storytelling. Together they strongly believe that photography must push alongside new technologies in order to take a leading role in the development of storytelling in the digital era.

Wednesday July 1st / 14:30
Special Program: Four films on war by Sebastian Junger
‘Korengal’, a film by Sebastian Junger
Filmmaker Sebastian Junger embeds with a unit in Afghanistan to examine what war feels like and what it does to soldiers. ‘Korengal’ picks up where ‘Restrepo’ left off; the same men, the same valley, the same commanders, but a very different look at the experience of war.
(90’ - 2014)

Wednesday July 1st / 15:30
‘My Body: A War Zone’ exhibition
curated by PCRC & PROOF
with Blake Fitch, Nayan Tara Gurung Kakshapati, Pete Muller, Midhat Poturovic
Exhibition Opening with Edward Ferguson (British Ambassador to BiH), Midhat Poturovic (photographer), Hasija Brankovic (survivor), Tim Bidey (PCRC)
BBI Center Square
An outdoor photographic exhibition, created by PROOF: Media for Social Justice in collaboration with the Post-Conflict Research Center (PCRC). Featuring stories and portraits of women survivors of rape from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, Nepal, Bosnia and Herzegovina, and Colombia. Photographs represent the work of world-renowned photographers and artists, including Blake Fitch, Pete Muller, NayanTara Gurung Kakshapati and Midhat Poturović.
Sponsor: British Embassy Sarajevo

Wednesday July 1st / 18:30
Maydan - Hundred Portraits’ exhibition, by Emeric Lhuisset
Exhibition Opening with Emeric Lhuisset
Duplex 100m2
On Maydan Square in Kiev, French photographer Émeric Lhuisset created a compelling series of portraits of the demonstrators. He asked all of them two questions, which they answered on a sheet of paper:
- What would you like to see happening now?
- What do you think will happen?
With ‘Maydan - Hundred Portraits’, Lhuisset introduces us to the faces of the revolution in February 2014. The protests united thousands of Ukrainians who were tired of the government’s corruption and the Russian grip on their country. The situation escalated when protesters were fired upon by the authorities, leading to the death of more than 100 people – referred to as the ‘Heavenly Hundred’. By combining his background in geopolitics with visual arts, Lhuisset questions the representation of conflicts in mass media with an alternative approach.
Emeric Lhuisset grew up in suburban Paris and lives between Middle East and Paris. He has participated in numerous exhibitions and interventions. In addition to his art practice, he hosts a cycle of conferences between the Institute of Political Studies of Paris and New York University about “contemporary art & geopolitics”. From Kabul to Kirkuk through the mountains of Pakistan, Iraq, and Colombia, Lhuisset seeks to raise questions about the representation of conflict and how we perceive it.
Sponsors: Agnès b. endowment fund - Mondriaan Fund - Paradox

Wednesday July 1st / 21:00
Srebrenica’s Voices’, a film by Nedim Loncarevic
World Premiere
Followed by a discussion with Nedim Loncarevic
An intimate and moving tale of the survivors if Srebrenica, bringing into question the reasons behind the apparent negligence of the international community that lead to what is today recognised as an act of genocide.
Nedim Loncarevic is a journalist, documentary filmmaker and writer. Loncarevic began his career as a journalist in Yugoslavia, where he was in charge of the documentary magazine Black on White for more than 10 years before becoming the chief editor of television in Sarajevo just before the war broke out. Correspondent for RFI. Director of several documentaries awarded like ‘The tunnel’. Today he lives in France where he continues to make films.
(52’ - 2015)

 

Thursday July 2nd / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Peter Bouckaert, Emma Daly, Klaartje Quirijns

Thursday July 2nd / 11:00
Special Program: A day with Human Rights Watch
‘Human Rights Watch’ conference
with Peter Bouckaert, Emma Daly, Klaartje Quirijns
How does Human Rights Watch work.
Peter Bouckaert, Emergencies Director, Human Rights Watch. An expert in humanitarian crises, Peter Bouckaert is responsible for coordinating the organization's response to major wars and other human rights crises. Bouckaert is a veteran of fact-finding missions to Lebanon, Kosovo, Chechnya, Afghanistan, Iraq, Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territories, Macedonia, Indonesia, Uganda, and Sierra Leone, among others. Most recently, Bouckaert has been in the Central African Republic, where he has conducted investigations into ethnic cleansing and war crimes committed during the current civil war. Peter Bouckaert is featured in the 2014 documentary film ‘E-Team’, which was premiered at the Sundance Film Festival.
Emma Daly, Communications Director at Human Rights Watch. Overseeing all media communication coming from the organization, a position she has held since July 2007. Prior to that, she worked as Press Director after joining HRW in November 2005. Before joining HRW, Daly spent 18 years as a journalist, mostly as a foreign correspondent, working for the New York Times, the Independent, Newsweek, the Observer and Reuters, among others.
Klaartje Quirijns is the director of the ‘The Dictator Hunter’. A Dutch film and television director and producer, Quirijnshas worked as a documentary director and producer for the public stations VPRO, IKON and NPS.

Thursday July 2nd / 14:30
Special Program: A day with Human Rights Watch
‘Talking about Rose’, a film by Isabel Coixet
Narrated by French actress Juliette Binoche, this 30 minute documentary film examines the life and death of Rose Lokissim, Chadian opposition leader who died at the hands of Hissene Habre’s regime. Talking About Rose reveals how she risked her life to tell the outside world about the brutality of Habre’s prisons. The film is especially poignant given Habre’s eagerly awaited trial in Senegal.
(30’ - 2015)
‘The Dictator Hunter’, a film by Klaartje Quirijns
Followed by a discussion with Klaartje Quirijns
"If you kill one person, you go to jail. If you kill 40 people, they put you in an insane asylum. But if you kill 40, 000 people, you get a comfortable exile with a bank account in another country, and that's what we want to change here," - Reed Brody, Human Rights Watch.
Follow Reed Brody over the course of two suspenseful years as he travels through Africa, Europe and the United States, to bring to justice the former dictator of Chad, Hissène Habré, charged of killing thousands of his own countrymen in the 1980s.
(83’ - 2007)

Thursday July 2nd / 18:30
Special Program: A day with Human Rights Watch
‘Terror in Central African Republic’ exhibition, by Marcus Bleasdale
Exhibition Opening with Peter Bouckaert
Java Gallery
Marcus Bleasdale (Human Rights Watch / National Geographic Magazine) is a documentary photographer who uses his work to influence policy makers around the world. Since 2013 Marcus Bleasdale has covered the brutal conflict in the Central African Republic together with Peter Bouckaert, the Emergencies Director of Human Rights Watch. His work was awarded the Robert Capa Gold Medal in 2014.
Partnership: Visa pour l’Image Perpignan - Sponsor: Initial

Thursday July 2nd / 21:00
Special Program: A day with Human Rights Watch
E-Team’, a film by Ross Kauffman & Katy Chevigny
Followed by a discussion with Peter Bouckaert
Anna, Ole, Fred and Peter are four members of the Emergencies Team - or E-Team - the most intrepid division of a respected, international human rights group (Human Rights Watch). Trained to deal with unfolding crises, the E-Team flies to hotspots all over the world as soon as allegations of human rights abuse surface. Then they get to work - gathering crucial evidence to determine if further investigation is warranted and, if so, to investigate, document, and capture the world's attention. They also immediately challenge the responsible decision makers, holding them accountable. Human rights abuses thrive on secrecy and silence, and the work of the E-Team, backed by their international human rights organization, has shone light in dark places and given voice to thousands whose stories would never otherwise have been told.
(88’ – 2014)

 

Friday July 3rd / 10:00
Meet the Press - A Morning Coffee with Sebastian Junger

Friday July 3rd / around the city
‘Migrations’, a photojournalism / street art project by #Dysturb
with Jose Colon, Laurence Geai, Olivier Jobard, Moutafis, Myrto Papadopoulos, Emanuele Satolli
A WARM Partner Project
This is the second year #Dysturb is involved with WARM in Sarajevo and #Dysturb will this year be pasting photographs taken by Olivier Jobard and Giorgos Moutafis (among others) that highlight migration - an issue that has been propelled by conflict and poverty in countries such as Afghanistan, Iraq, Myanmar, Syria and Ukraine.
#Dysturb is a group of freelance photographers, who take current international photojournalism to the streets. By pasting large format photographs on the walls of city hubs, #Dysturb presents photojournalism in a new, innovative way, completely independent from the restrictions of conventional news publishing channels. Thus, generating discussion around current issues whilst also developing community engagement.

Friday July 3rd / 11:00
‘Maydan - Hundred Portraits’, a slideshow and discussion by Emeric Lhuisset
Photographer Émeric Lhuisset discuss his ‘Maydan - Hundred Portraits’ exhibition (Duplex 100m2) and other art works.

Friday July 3rd / 14:30
Special Program: Four films on war by Sebastian Junger
‘Which Way is The Front Line from Here? The Life and Time of Tim Hetherington’, a film by Sebastian Junger
Together with his friend and long-term collaborator Sebastian Junger, Tim Hetherington had travelled the world documenting conflicts in Afghanistan, Liberia and Libya among other locations. Best known for their 2010 film 'Restrepo' which was nominated for an Academy Award, the two strived to capture the humanity within conflict situations and with their images they focused on the individuals involved and their experiences of the violence surrounding them. Unfortunately, in 2011 Tim was killed by a mortar blast and this film is a tribute and celebration of the legacy he has left behind and includes Sebastian conducting interviews with those who knew Tim best.
(78’ – 2013)

Friday July 3rd / 18:30
Exhibitions Openings
Academy of Fine Arts

Discordia’ exhibition, by Moises Saman
A WARM Partner Project
‘Discordia’ documents photographer Moises Saman’s personal journey as a witness to the Arab Spring. This body of work takes the viewer on a four-year voyage through Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Iraq, Lebanon and Syria as these states drift from revolutionary throes to violent fallouts. This project chronicles the indelible transformation of the region in this momentous period in Arab history.
Moises Saman is an American/Spanish documentary photographer and a member of Magnum Photos. His work has focused on the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan, and more recently the turmoil of the Arab Spring.
 Moises was one of the first photographers to reach northern Afghanistan after the 9/11 attacks in 2001, and one of the few journalists inside Baghdad during the initial “Shock and Awe” bombing campaign in 2003 against the regime of Saddam Hussein in Iraq. His body of work from Iraq and Afghanistan has received numerous international awards. In 2011, Moises relocated to Cairo, Egypt, where he was based for three years while covering the Arab Spring for The New York Times and The New Yorker. His ongoing book project 'Discordia' documents the tumultuous transitions that have taken place in the region. The work featured in 'Discordia' has received numerous awards, including the Eugene Smith Memorial Fund (2014), the Henri Nannen Preis (2014), the World Press Photo (2014), and Pictures of the Year International (2012, 2014). In 2015 Moises received a Guggenheim Fellowship to continue his work in the region.
Exhibition co-producer: Bayeux-Calvados Award for War Correspondents
Partners: Magnum - Cesura

‘The Forensic Turn’ exhibition, curated by Paul Lowe
with images by Edmund Clark, Zijah Gafic, Ashley Gilbertson, Shannon Jensen, Simon Norfolk, Fred Ramos
Exhibition Opening with Paul Lowe & Zijah Gafic
Images of atrocity are deeply problematic, in that they potentially create a tension between form and content and are often accused of re-victimisation, aesthetisation of suffering, compassion fatigue and exploitation. As an alternative, therefore, there is considerable potential in examining images associated with atrocity that do not depict the actual act of violence or the victim itself, but rather depict the spaces and object involved such acts. By exploiting the presence of absence in objects, the photographers offer an alternative and powerful route to the documentation of violence.
Edmund Clark ‘Control Order House’ - Ziyah Gafic ‘Quest for identity’ - Ashley Gilbertson ‘Bedrooms of the Fallen’ - Shannon Jensen ‘A Long Walk’ - Simon Norfolk ‘Archeaological treasures from the Tigris Valley’ - Fred Ramos ‘The Last Outfit of the Missing’
Partners: University of the Arts London - Photography Archive Research Centre

'Media & Myth - Mass Media and the Vietnam War' exhibition
curated by Monica Alcazar-Duarte and Lewis Bush with Paul Lowe
with artists Jacob Balzani, Madeleine Corcoran, Cinzia D’Ambrosi, Veronika Lukasova, Amin Musa, Lewis Bush, Monica Alcazar-Duarte
Exhibition Opening with Paul Lowe
The 'Media & Myth' exhibition brings together material produced for the London College of Communication’s NAM project, which explored the role of the media in the Vietnam War. Participants in the project have taken diverse approaches to this broad topic, from examining the ways in which photography was used to record the conflict, to looking at the culture of underground zine production that took place amongst US servicemen stationed in south-east Asia. They have also used an array of media to express their ide- as and research, from photo collages to video installations. The curators say: "The Vietnam War might have passed into history, but it’s lessons and legacy remain plain to see in the conduct of modern wars and the way the media report them, and in the ways that these conflicts merge with popular culture and entertainment."
'Media & Myth' also includes photographs drawn from the Stanley Kubrick archive, which proved to be a key resource for many of the participants in the NAM project. On display are images produced during the making of the director’s 1985 Vietnam War film 'Full Metal Jacket', which reveal how Kubrick sought to dress and disguise the disused Becton Gas Works site in East London as the set of the battlescarred Vietnamese city of Hue.
'Media & Myth' was first staged in 2014 to coincide with the fiftieth anniversary of the 1964 Gulf of Tonkin incident. This attack by North Vietnamese boats on the warship USS Maddox was used by the United States government as a pretext to escalate its military involvement in Vietnam, despite furnishing only scant evidence in the form of a series of grainy and indistinct photographs. The curators say: "The dire consequences of this military escalation for the people of the United States, Vietnam and the wider region, demonstrates the huge power of the media in shaping the way wars are fought, remembered, and understood."
Partners: University of the Arts London - Photography Archive Research Centre

Friday July 3rd / 21:00
Special Program: Four films on war by Sebastian Junger
The Last Patrol’, a film by Sebastian Junger
Followed by a discussion with Sebastian Junger
Whether fighting or documenting the realities on the ground as a journalist, how does the context of war transform a person’s identity? What happens to that identity when soldiers return home? Sebastian Junger, war journalist and writer, explores these questions on a soul-searching journey with three comrades-in-arms. Junger, joined by Brendan O’Bryne and Dave Roels, protagonists of the Academy Award-nominated documentary ‘Restrepo’and combat journalist Guillermo Cervera walk along railroad tracks from Washington, DC to Pennsylvania. They move with a purposeful invisibility designed to echo the isolation felt by many who return from war. The men live outdoors and discuss the transition from soldier to civilian. With the backdrop of a varied United States revealed by the path of the tracks - ghettos and wealthy suburbs, heavy industry and farm country - the juxtaposition of scenery and conversations uncover diverse and conflicting American perceptions of war and what it means for veterans to come home.
Sebastian Junger is the author of ‘The Perfect Storm’, ‘A Death in Belmont’, ‘Fire’ and ‘War’, and director of ‘Restrepo’, ‘Korengal’, ‘Which way if the front line from here?’ and ‘The Last Patrol’.
As a contributing editor to Vanity Fair and as a contributor to ABC News, he has covered major international news stories in Liberia, Sierra Leone and other places around the globe. For over a year, Junger and photojournalist Tim Hetherington embedded with battle company of the 173rd Airborne Brigade Combat Team, in the remote and heavily contested Korengal valley of eastern Afghanistan. Their film ‘Restrepo’ won the 2010 Grand Jury Prize at the Sundance Film Festival. Junger has reported on the LURD besiegement of Monrovia in Liberia, human rights abuses in Sierra Leone, war crimes in Kosovo, the peacekeeping mission in Cyprus, wildfire in the American West, guerilla war in Afghanistan, and hostage-taking in Kashmir. He has worked as a freelance radio correspondent during the war in Bosnia. Junger lives in New York City and on Cape Cod.
(86’ – 2014)

 

Saturday July 4th / 19:00
WARM FESTIVAL CLOSING CEREMONY
with Rémy Ourdan, Paul Lowe, Mirsad Purivatra, Damir Sagolj & Festival Guests

‘Commander Khawani’, a film by Florent Marcie
World Premiere
Followed by a discussion with Florent Marcie
A WARM Partner Project
Afghanistan, October 2001. One month after attacks on the World Trade Center, US airstrikes in Afghanistan began attacks in an attempt to overthrow the Taliban. On the front lines of Bagram and marked by twenty years of war, commander Khawani and his mujahedeen are waiting for the attack on Kabul. Between two airstrikes, they start talking to the enemy by radio…
Florent Marcie shoots, edits and produces himself his films, all related to war. He is the director of ‘Saia’, a short film on a frontline at night in Afghanistan, and of ‘Itchkéri Kenti’, a long documentary film on the war in Chechnya, among others. His film ‘Tomorrow Tripoli’, on the war in Libya, was screened as a world premiere at the First WARM Festival in Sarajevo in 2014.
(2015)

Saturday July 4th / 22:00
WARM Festival Closing Party

 

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